How to Deal With Form Rejections

First things first, whatever you do, don’t write anything back after you receive a form rejection.

A form rejection hurts. All writers will receive them at some point in their career if they take their pursuit seriously enough to submit their work to competitive markets. Even if you’ve done the appropriate research and found an excellent match for your writing, you’ll still face form rejections. Even if you’ve polished your story, poems, or manuscript, you’ll still face form rejections. It’s the ugliest part of being in the literary game.

Whatever you do, don’t mirror that ugliness.

A form rejection doesn’t mean that you are a bad writer. Simplistic an argument as it is, know that if it did, there would not be any good writers because every writer has had to deal with form rejections at some point in their career (usually throughout). All a form rejection means is that for one reason or another, your work was not an appropriate match for the place that you submitted it to. It doesn’t mean that you don’t have talent. Read that again. It doesn’t mean that you don’t have talent. The publisher or editor is not trying to personally insult you. There are any number of considerations that go into whether a piece is accepted or passed on. The desire to insult a writer’s pride is not a consideration in any publisher, editor, or reader’s mind, so please don’t read a form rejection as such.

When the decision you’ve been waiting for from a literary magazine or publisher comes in, if it’s not to your liking, whatever you do, please don’t blast the publisher or editor. This can do serious harm to your literary reputation. At the very least, it’s the mark of a rank amateur.

Writing is like baseball. They both are slow. They both are pastoral. They both can be construed as largely solitary (compare baseball to other popular team sports…) And like baseball, if you are hitting .300, you’re doing awfully well. You’re a downright star. The point is that when you miss the mark, as you surely will, brush it off as best as you can. Once the pain of the rejection subsides, re-examine your piece. Is there anything about it that you can touch up? Are there other journals or publishers that would be a good match? Go right back out and give it your best shot. In the literary game, your degree of resiliency matters just as much as your innate talent…

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