How To Promote A Self-Published eBook – Two Simple Ways to Get Major Results

I’m a huge fan of retro video games. Like many Reagan babies, I owned an NES, a Nintendo lunch box, ate Nintendo cereal, watched the Super Mario Bros. Super Show; I could go on, but you get the idea. After the NES faded in popularity, I went on to the Super Nintendo and Sega Genesis, then the PlayStation and Nintendo 64, before losing interest when I attended college (Parties are more fun. Studying has its purpose too, I suppose).

Now, at 33-years-old and with a little bit of disposable income, I’ve started to collect some of the games I missed purchasing in my childhood. There are certain “brands” that I’ll buy pretty much anything from (e.g. Mega Man; Castlevania; Ninja Gaiden; The Legend of Zelda; Metroid; etc.), but what about the games I didn’t get a chance to play or that were unknown to me back then? I’ll buy a few of those too, but only if I see a demonstration on a YouTube channel, and hear some reputable voices vouch for it.

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The reason I include this anecdote is because the same methods that work for alerting me to retro video games that I should give a chance are the same ones that alert me and many other readers to self-published writers that are worth a read.

Dispel the notion once and for all that if you write it, they will come. They won’t. You have to get noticed or self-publishing is an exercise in futility if your goal is to make money and/or get people to read your writing. I’ve known many talented writers who choose to self-publish. What happens when they release their books? Nothing. It’s every self-published writer’s worst fear.

So, how exactly do you get readers and sales for your eBook? 

  1. Win over an influencer. Some think getting good reviews on Amazon or Smashwords are enough. Not true; they help, but you need to draw traffic first. The best way to do that is to have an Internet influencer promote you on their media. Who exactly qualifies as an influencer? A good ballpark figure is at least 1,000 followers on social media or WordPress, or the face behind a heavily-trafficked website that many people in your niche know about. While press anywhere helps, to get real results you need to get an endorsement from an Internet “star.”
  2. Give some of it away for free. That means giving free copies of your book to influencers. That means putting up chapters for free online. You’re not Dan Brown or Stephen King yet, so you have to earn your readers’ attention and show that you’re talented.

And that’s it. Are there other ways that you can promote your eBook? Of course. That said, if you want results in a big way and quickly, focus on the big win. Anything else is often just a tiresome waste.

Have you had success as a self-published author? Share a comment below to help aspiring authors. 

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Promoting Your Creative Writing

Before I launch into this post, I hope that you’ll read my poem “Smyrna, 1993” published today in Eunoia Review, an excellent online literary journal.

There’s a tendency for many writers to often downplay their own achievements. Out of modesty, they may not want to promote their writing as often as they should, or even at all. Doing so is seen as commercial and crass.

I don’t believe that this attitude is a healthy one. Writing is about sharing your vision with the world. You can’t do that if you’re an unknown. It’s so much easier to get yourself moving in the right direction if you start letting people know who you are and what you’ve done. 

But how can you do so? Here are four ways to consider:

1. Social Media – Whenever good things happen, whether it be having a piece published in a literary journal, putting out an eBook, getting booked for a reading, completing the first draft of your novel, or planning to visit an open mic to perform poetry, let your friends and followers on social media know about it. 

2. Get Connected to Local Writers – Regardless of if you live in a metropolitan area or a small town, there will be other writers around. Find them. Join their groups. Go to their events. Strike up friendships with them. Being an insider will help integrate you in the literary game.

3. Online Writing Spaces – Read the blogs of other writers. Join writing-related message boards and websites. Help other writers whenever possible. If you put forth a good effort, you’ll soon establish some excellent contacts who would be happy to assist you in promoting your own writing.

4. Help Publishers – Volunteer in some capacity for a literary magazine or small press that publishes work that you enjoy. If you have relevant experience, consider applying for positions at a major publisher.

How do you promote your own writing? Did I miss anything that may be helpful to an aspiring writer? Please feel free to share your thoughts.

Join The Literary Game’s Facebook Group

I really want to turn The Literary Game into an interactive space where writers can learn and grow in many ways. In the hopes of doing so, I’ve started a Facebook group for us.

I’d be honored if you would join our group, and if you’d let your literary-minded friends know about what we’re doing here. I’m on the page, and so are my editors. We’d be thrilled to help with your questions or concerns, but we don’t want this to be about us – we want it to be about writers helping other writers out.

The forum is pretty open. You can use it to:

  • Ask and answer questions
  • Promote your books/writing-related projects and blogs
  • Meet new literary friends
  • Post helpful information

All the bells and whistles (like a logo) may not be ready yet, but that doesn’t matter much, right? It’s the community that counts.

I hope you join us on Facebook. Just click here. Please tell your friends.